Friday, February 28, 2014

March-April 2014

Administrators Note’s 

Ralph Gibson 

I hope all of you have had a chance to visit the new Placer County website. It offers a different browsing experience because you’ll find broad categories to choose from instead of a list of departments. If you’re looking for health care, click on “Health and Family Care”. If you want museums or libraries, click on “Community and Recreation”. Of course, our online presence goes well beyond our county webpage to include a blog and Facebook page. But the online work I am most proud is our YouTube channel. Most of the content on our channel was created by Exhibits Preparator, Jason Adair. Some of the videos include a humorous look at a vintage bear trap, a silent film of a recent gold mining trip, and a film about the history of the DeWitt Government Center.

We’ve recently decided to use our YouTube page to assist us with our Living History program. The program runs on parent involvement, and those parents are trained to run the stations. In order to run smoothly, parents need to be trained ahead of time. Getting parents to onsite training has been difficult the past several years and has led to many stressful mornings trying to train parents before the bus arrives. To counter this, we introduced online parent/teacher training videos. We’ve only had one day of Living History so far, but all the parents were trained online and the day ran smoothly.

So, if you’ve grown weary of watching funny cat or sleeping baby videos on YouTube, check out our page and actually learn something.

A Letter from the Editor 

Jason Adair

Dear Readers, I have been very busy this month drawing pictures for a new exhibit. Ergo, I haven’t had time to write anything pithy for this space. So, please accept these drawings of old office machines instead.

Artifact Access -VS- Artifact Protection

Kasia Woroniecka

 As a Curator of Collections my responsibility is the care of objects in our museums and our storage facility. I care for rare and priceless objects, memorabilia and works of art that have been donated by people who, just like me, want to see them preserved for future generations. The best way to keep them safe and prevent damage when they are on display is not to touch them. It is not always easy to achieve that. No matter how often we ask visitors to use appropriate manners there will always be those who ignore museum rules. Recently, a visitor to the Ai Weiwei exhibit at the Perez Art Museum in Miami destroyed a vase valued at $1 million. Maximo Caminero, who is an artist, claimed that he smashed it to protest the museum’s lack of displays of local artists. Has was charged with criminal mischief.

Although benefits of physical interaction are great, they are not always possible, especially when dealing with fragile, unique and significant objects. Museums have been dealing with this issue since the beginning. Cabinets of curiosities offered visitors an intimate encounter with rare objects and touching objects and pictures was not frowned upon. By the mid-nineteenth century that has changed. As collections grew so did public interest, which led museums and private galleries to devise their own ways of minimizing risks to their collections by safeguarding objects in glass cases and limiting the number of visitors. A hands-off policy became a practical necessity.

 In their effort to make their museum more accessible and user friendly the Louvre, has recently lifted a ban on taking photos in their most crowded and popular galleries. As a result the visitors turned into paparazzi that would do anything for a photo. Museum officials quickly learned that allowing photos in the busy galleries made a clear change for the worse. A visit to Mona Lisa's gallery at the end of the day revealed a room littered with used museum maps and discarded soda bottles. It became obvious that visitors’ goals changed - they were no longer there to view the works but to get their souvenir pictures.

As visitors try to take as many pictures and touch what they like they forget that many of the items from our past are irreplaceable. Touching causes surface damage as dirt and the natural oils on our skin eat into surfaces. Even flash photography causes damage not immediately visible to the human eye.

In the last year, almost 300,000 visitors were entertained and educated at our six museums. Let’s hope that those in a quest for a satisfying museum experience this year will respect the past and will make museum etiquette part of their experience.

The Scoop 

Beth Rohlfes 

Today’s cutting edge museums that engage visitors in a dynamic and relevant way entertain as well as educate. In our fast-paced digital age, studies show that we—especially our younger people—learn better through stimulation and interaction.

As a former art curator, I found it highly effective to present lots of hands-on art projects that were relevant to my shows. One of my favorite exhibits featured the pop-up books of Auburn artist, David Carter. Guests explored the engineering of these cut-out marvels by manipulating large, eight-foot models of the original book-sized pop-ups. They came in droves to learn directly from the artist how to make simple pop-ups or engineer their own unique designs with colored paper and scissors.

As Curator of Education for the Placer County Museums, I want to help engage visitors in our history museums. According to Nina Simon, Director of the Santa Cruz Museum of Art & History, participatory museums are necessary to help us build “21st century skills”—creativity, collaboration and innovation—to ensure our success in this globally interconnected world. So how are we building these skills through participatory experience at the Placer County Museums?

 Take a look at an exhibit at our Courthouse Museum. “What Killed the American Hat” as a very well-planned, wildly creative exhibit inviting visitor participation. Whether or not you care about fashion or hats, the exhibit engages you in a fun, crazy game of sleuthing. You’re encouraged to think creatively, look for clues within the historic newspaper text, and write down your theories. The exhibit cycles your creative ideas back into the exhibit itself.

Often effective in encouraging visitor participation are the museum artifacts themselves. When carefully selected, then presented through artful exhibit design, artifacts can be the center of a social experience. This month, our new display of vintage office equipment and furniture will be installed on the second floor of Placer County’s Finance Administration Building. We’ve selected and juxtaposed an array of intriguing office items from various decades since the mid-19th century. Creative layout and design elements, as well as clever and information-packed item descriptions are expected to draw passersby into interested reminiscence and dialogue with their office mates about the early stages of our Digital Information Age.

Another highly effective program of museum participation happening at the Placer County Museums is our volunteer program. Volunteers are both the participants and the catalysts for others to participate. Dedicated volunteers work regular and ongoing hours at our Archives and Collections. While they are learning new skills and enjoying the confidence that this brings, they are contributing valuable work to the Museum Archives.

As catalysts for participation, our museum Docents are engaging visitors every day in the delightful stories surrounding the rich history of our county. I have seen docents artfully enticing visitors to recognize their connection with history through their own stories. One visitor’s story about grandma cooking warm country breakfasts on a stove like the one in the Bernhard Museum encourage similar storytelling from other visitors, and the personal connection to history also becomes a surprising connection to a total stranger. How often, after all, have you really felt you have participated in a rewarding museum experience because of the Docent?


Placer County Historical Society 2014-15 Nominations 

President: Michael Otten 1st

Vice President: George Lay

2nd Vice President (programs): Addah Owens

Secretary: Melanie Barton

Treasurer: Al Stoll

Board members (Two-Year Terms, 2014-15 to 2015-16): Sherri Schackner, Walt Wilson, Penny Watson, Karri Samson

(Carry over elected Board Members from 2013-14 with additional year remaining: Jean Allender, Karen Bleuel, John Knox.)

--Respectfully submitted, Walt Wilson, chair, Nomination Committee, Winona Virgil, Smith Virgil, Betty Samson, Karri Samson

Officers for 2014-2015 will be elected at annual membership dinner meeting April 3, 2014, Veterans Memorial Hall, 100 East St., Auburn

At that time the Nomination Committee will make a final report. Additional nominations may be made and a vote taken. If a candidate is unopposed, election to that office may be made by voice vote. Should there be more than one nominee for an office then there shall be an election by ballot for that office. Those elected will assume office May 1, the start of the fiscal year.


President’s Message 

Michael Otten, President 

 PCHS: Arts Commission Honors City Historian

Auburn, this is our kind of town. You can disagree. But like Frank Sinatra made Chicago and New York, New York his kinds of towns, Loreley Brewer Hodkin made Auburn her colorful kind of town and has no qualms about letting others join in.

Such was the case on the eve of Valentine's Day at City Hall. Mayor Bridget Powers, the City Arts Commission, and family members to the fourth generation saluted her at a celebration of her collected artwork she donated to the city.

The exhibit of Hodkin's hand-colored vintage lithographs and photographs of Auburn's historical buildings will be on display during city business hours through April 4. You may well have seen some of her nearly 100 pieces on the internet, at Bootleggers, Community First Bank or other places. Ms. Hodkin has made it easy to get your own copy pretty much for the cost of materials. If interested call 530-820-3644.

Her association with Auburn's current City Hall goes back 80 years when she was a first grade student. It was then known as the Auburn Grammar School and the 1934 classroom was located in what is now the Rose Room.

During her period as volunteer City Historian, 2002-10, she discovered that Auburn during its early days was quite colorful. Using water colors she tried to bring out hues the way they might have been. In the process she uncovered things nobody had noticed, such as an 1891 lithograph showing Santa driving a horse-drawn wagon through Auburn.

 This PCHS member and Auburn's first official City Historian used the Feb. 13 occasion to tell city officials they need to do more to exploit the Placer County seat's unique Gold Rush history.

 The way Loreley Hodkin sees it, the icons of California are found in the four daguerreotype 1850s images of Auburn Ravine and Spanish Flat. She insists they need to be more prominently displayed. She compared the images to symbolizing the Gold Rush to images of the Coliseum as symbolizing Rome and the Roman Empire.

The images put faces to the dream of instant wealth. They portray Chinese who came for Gum Shan (Gold Mountain), Blacks, Anglos and a woman bringing lunch in a male dominated culture.

A few years ago Loreley fashioned the images into a paper display for the City Streetscape Committee to show how grand it would look in a permanent Central Square fixture to no avail. But Loreley doesn't quit. She's still working on it. otten@ssctv.net



Placer County Historical Society Dinner Meeting

Addah Owens, Vice President

When: Thursday February 6th

Time: 6:30 Dinner, 7:30 Program

Where: Veterans Memorial Hall, 100 East St., Auburn, CA Cost: $14 per person

 Menu: Baked Glazed Ham, Scalloped Potatoes, Green Salad, Seasonal Vegetables, Rolls, Pineapple Upside-Down Cake Mail Check to: PCHS, c/o Betty Samson, 8780 Baxter Grade Road, Auburn, CA 95603

Program: Sesquicentennial and Centennial on the Establishment of Rocklin.

This program, presented by Sierra College History Professor and Rocklin Historical Society President Dan Deffoe, will cover Rocklin’s beginnings 150 years ago.

It will also detail events that occurred 100 years ago. Namely, the shootout that killed Marshall Renaldi and the horrendous fire that destroyed downtown Rocklin.

Artifact Highlight 

This Crown fluting iron became part of our collection in 1990. Very popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, this tool was used to create pleats. A wide variety of these were manufactured. They were used most often on collars, cuffs, petticoat edgings and dress trims. This iron is operated with a crank. The rollers are removable and hollow for faster heating. The fabric, starched and damp dry, was placed between the two rollers and arranged in a desired position before the rollers were turned.


 

Placer County Historical Organizations 

Colfax Area Historical Society
Helen Wayland, (530) 346-7040 colfaxhistory.org

Donner Summit Historical Society
Bill Oudegeest, (209) 606-6859 donnersummithistoricalsociety.org

Foresthill Divide Historical Society
Sandy Simester, (530) 367-3535 foresthillhistory.org

Fruitvale School Hall Community Association
Lyndell Grey, (916) 645-3517

Golden Drift Historical Society
Jim Ricker, (530) 389-8344

Historical Advisory Board
Glenn Vineyard, (916) 747-1961

Old Town Auburn Preservation Society
Lynn Carpenter, (530) 885-1252 Lincoln

Highway Association
Bob Dieterich, bobd@iname.com or lincolnhwy.org

Lincoln Area Archives Museum
Elizabeth Jansen, (916) 645-3800 laamca.org

Joss House Museum and Chinese History Center
Richard Yue, (530) 346-7121

Loomis Basin Historical Society
Karen Clifford, (916) 663-3871 ppgn.com/loomishistorical.html

Roseville Fire Museum
Shari -Tasler, (916) 538-1809 rosevillefiremuseum.org

Maidu Museum & Historic Site
Glenie Strome, (916) 782-3299 roseville.ca.us/indianmuseum

Native Sons of the Golden West, Parlor #59
Dave Allen, (530) 878-2878 dsallen59@sbcglobal.net

Newcastle Portuguese Hall Association
Aileen Gage, (530) 885-911

Placer County Historical Society
Michael Otten, (530) 888-7837 placercountyhistoricalsociety.org

Placer County Museums Docent Guild
Tom Innes, (530) 888-8969

Rocklin Historical Society
Jean Sippola, (916) 652-1034 rocklinhistory.org

Roseville Historical Society
Phoebe Astill, (916) 773-3003 rosevillehistorical.org

North Lake Tahoe Historical Society
Javier Rodriguez, (530) 583-1762 northtahoemuseums.org

Placer County Genealogical Society,
Toni Rosasco, (530) 888-8036 pcgenes.com

Monday, January 13, 2014

January - February 2014

Administrator's Notes

Ralph Gibson


     I recently read a headline that screamed: 80 Percent of Scientific Data is Gone! The crux of the article was that data was only available to other researchers for about 20 years before being lost due to obsolete data storage devices. In today’s digital age we have to be mindful to preserve the history we are creating now.

     The Library of Congress has taken a first step toward solving this problem by archiving billions of tweets. Some might think this is a ridiculous waste of time and taxpayer money, but historians 100 years from now will view this digital archive as a virtual gold mine. What I wouldn’t give to be able to peek into the mind of a Forty-Niner as he tweeted about life in the gold fields. 

     Of course, they didn’t have this technology all those years ago, but it’s fun to imagine how they would have used it. Think of our own local history; what would Mr. Bernhard blog about? His fruit yield? What the second story door on his house was for?

Was Joe Armes doomed the moment he sent a heart emoticon to Alma Bell on Match.com? 

Anyone who saw the posts on Adolf Weber’s Facebook page knew he was up to no good that night.

Rattlesnake Dick used Google Maps to find gold shipment routes, but was finally done in when Deputy Tax Collector George W. Martin received an anonymous email about Dick’s location. 

How do you calculate the size and number of granite blocks needed for a major construction project while at the job site? Griffith Griffith had an app for that. 

     Historians comb through pages and pages of documents, letters, journals, newspapers and photographs to better understand our past. Today, with our reliance on so many tools and applications that produce no tangible document, I wonder what methods historians of the future might use. Will they be able to recover important information about our lives? Or are we deleting our history each time we empty the recycle bin on our desktop?     

A Letter from the Editor

Jason Adair

     Dear Readers, 
Facebook is a cruel mistress who demands constant attention and repays you with wasted time and possibly a repetitive stress disorder. We here at the museums have a Facebook page that I have been manning for the past year. I’ve done my best to use a lot of photos and poor grammar to give our account that real feeling. If you haven’t “liked” it, you should take a minute and do so at facebook.com/placercountymuseums. Doing so will help you keep abreast of the latest developments at our museums and will give you and I yet another way to share photos and videos of cats.

     In other news, we still have space in The Placer for articles from any history lovers/gatherers out there. We’d especially like anything related to the Civil Defense program. Our next exhibit in the Placer County Museum is going to showcase items from the county’s old Civil Defense caches as well as recollections about living in a time where getting under a school desk would save you from atomic death from above.

That is all.


The Placer County Museums Washing Machine Collection

Kasia Woroniecka


Aimee I. Hubbard and Violet Hubbard - Laundry Day.   
PCM Archives. Kathlyn Taylor Jones Collection.

     Doing laundry has always been a dreaded and time consuming chore. It’s no surprise that early washers were marketed as “monuments to women’s freedom”, able to “add many years to your life, save your health, keep the wrinkles out of your face and keep you youthful.” Before multiple temperature settings and load sizes of modern washing machines, laundry had to be sorted and soaked overnight, usually on a Saturday. The wash began early Monday morning. A tub of water was heated on the stove and the clothes were scrubbed by hand on a washboard and rinsed. Clothes were hung to dry and on Wednesday they were folded. Mangling and ironing took place on Thursday and Friday. On Saturday the process was repeated.
     A rotary washing machine was invented in the 1850’s. Hand-operated washing machines continued to be popular even after the arrival of the electric motor in the early 1900’s when companies like Maytag, Whirlpool and Hurley began mass production. The design of washing machines improved in the 1930s, with special emphasis on mechanical and electrical safety. Spin dryers replaced the electric powered wringers and in 1937 the first automatic washing machine was introduced by the Bendix Corporation. It was far from perfect, since it vibrated so roughly that it had to be bolted to the floor. By 1960 more than 90% of all households in America were using electric washers. 

Humboldt wooden manual rocking washer, the ancestor to the modern washing machine. It is the oldest washing machine in our collection, patented in 1870, and probably dates to the turn of the century. It is basically a wooden tub with legs. It has a washboard inside and a swinging basket composed of wood slats with a handle. The laundry was placed in the swinging basket which moved the clothing over the scrubbing board until it was clean. 







 
Maytag “Swinging Wringer” washing machine with an electric wringer attached. It is made of southern Cypress wood with a “milk stool” agitator under the top lid. 57,193 of these machines were produced between 1911 and 1925. Early washing machine developers faced many engineering challenges. To compensate for their shortcomings, practical messages for the user are stamped on the tub of this model, like “to secure best results spread clothes evenly when using wringer” and “oil bearings frequently.” The tub still had to be filled and emptied by hand. Often the motors on these machines used were not grounded, and since the washers often leaked, the operator ran a risk of electric shock, in addition to other dangers like braids caught in the wringer or lost fingers.

     

Maytag Gyrofoam washing machine with wringer circa 1920. This machine belonged to Victor Wickman, who owned and operated the Alexson Granite Company in Rocklin from the 1920s until the early 1940s. The Gyrofoam became the most popular washing machine in America in the early 1920’s. Not only could this Maytag clean your clothes, with the use of special attachments it could also churn butter, grind meat, and even wash dishes.


 

 

 

 

The Scoop

Beth Rohlfes


     The approach of our spring 2014 3rd grade Living History Program at the Bernhard Museum has me a little on edge. It will be my first complete season as full-time permanent employee, and there is work to do. I’m feeling both excited and anxiously responsible. After all, the Program has a history, and it’s a darn good one!

     What makes it so good? A well-designed formula of kid-friendly activities served up by a host of enthused parents and museum docents. Yes, of course. But at its heart is the experience of stepping back into the past—into the lives of people not too much different from us.

Living History students get to dress and act the part of children in Victorian America. In those four hours they become the Bernhard brood whose lives evolved around farm chores and simple play. They get it that hand scrubbing laundry and building fruit crates can be hard work, but it’s different enough to not feel like work, so they love it! 

Their trip back in time is capped by a tour inside the Bernhard home. This world of Victorian d├ęcor and decorum contrasts sharply to the 21st century they know. In the dining room a table is set for a family dinner, with hand-washed china, polished silver and painstakingly-ironed white linen—a big effort towards refinement that, I imagine, had to be challenging in a home where farm dust and long days of labor were the norm. 

So, what if a modern home, possibly even your home, became an historic site? What artifacts would the docent class of 2114 use to explain the daily lives of the folk from the year 2000?


“This is what they called a ‘smart phone.’ 
People used it to communicate with 
each other and to access information.” (OMG)


 “This is where families sat down to watch television,” future docent would say, “Back then it wasn’t uncommon to have one room dedicated solely to this pastime.”

“When the family moved here, all the homes were new and big to accommodate families with young children, sometimes as many as 2 or 3!”

“See all the books on these shelves? Families in 2014 still read printed books.”

 “Most people vacationed abroad at least once in their lifetime. Note the Costa Rican tourist pottery.”

“This sewing machine is almost 200 years old. It was likely passed down from mother to daughter. It’s unlikely that many women in 2014 actually sewed their own clothes, or even knew how to operate the machine, except in the most rudimentary fashion.”

Living history, you see, is not limited to a hands-on, 3rd grade field trip experience. It is about empathizing, stepping back into the lives of regular people. And ultimately, it’s about your life.     
And it’s about mine.

Placer County Historical Society Dinner Meeting

Addah Owens, Vice President



When: Thursday February 6th

Time: 6:30 Dinner, 7:30 Program
   
Where: Veterans Memorial Hall, 100 East St., Auburn, CA

Cost: $14 per person

Chinese New Year’s Menu: Sweet & Sour Won Tons, Egg Foo Young, Chicken Chow Mein, Pork Fried Rice, Chinese Salad, and Coconut Cake

Mail Check to: PCHS, c/o  Betty Samson, 8780 Baxter Grade Road, Auburn, CA 95603

Program: Romantic Tahoe: A peek at life on the North Shore of Lake Tahoe during the Depression.
Donna Howell teams up with Mike Lynch for special slide show presentation.

The slide program contains material not in the book. The book will be available for purchase at $10.00.


Placer County Historical Society News, President's Message

Michael Otten,
President

     Yikes! Another year slipped into the history books, albeit the driest on record. On Christmas Eve came the news: The 49ers are coming. The new rush for riches may well be called the "forever" one.
Postage rates go up 6.5 percent Jan. 26.They say the rise is temporary, like two years max, to recoup $2.8 billion because of severe losses in mail delivery volume since 2008.

     Starting Jan. 26, we go to the nation's first 49 cent stamp, the latest forever stamp. Indulge me.  I am still fascinated by what some internet aficionados refer to as "snail mail." Historically and practically it is still a big deal. 

     As the independent federal USPS agency boasts, it is the only delivery service that visits every address in the nation: 146 million homes and businesses, six days a week. It has 37,000 retail locations. USPS relies on postage sales, services and an ever increasing line of products to keep it afloat. The annual revenue for delivering nearly half the world's mail is $75 billion.

     The last two Januaries saw penny increases, to 45 forever in 2012, to 46 forever in 2013.  The forever series began in 2007 when the price jumped two cents to 41 cents. If you have any left, now might be the time to use them.

     This month's hike amounts to the price of the California Gold Rush Centennial stamp issued in 1948. That stamp commemorated James Marshall's historic find Jan. 24, 1848, in the tailrace of John Sutter's American River sawmill at Coloma. Methinks that at least with the issue of the first 49 cent forever stamp, it should have made the change date Jan. 24. It could highlight a colorful saga in postal history, the short-lived Pony Express, an era when one might spend a week's wages to send a less than one ounce missive across country. Interestingly, an 1880-2014 chart used by Wikipedia indicates when adjusted for inflation the 49 cent stamp is on a par with what folks were paying a century ago. 

     As a young newspaper carrier I couldn't wait to use some of my earnings to buy the latest commemoratives. I begged anyone I could for stamps off of old envelopes, and hinges and cellophane to attach stamps in my Scotts album. Alas, no children, grandchildren or great grandchildren have expressed any interest in the hobby.

     I still regularly use commemoratives. In the process I discovered "forever" choices are limited as mail addicts stock up for future savings. 

     It's time to hit the Old Town Post Office to make an investment. Auburn boasts this post office is the oldest in California housed in its original building and the oldest continually operated Post Office west of the Mississippi.

Call it a fun way to enjoy history in the New Year.



Calendar of Events

January

Jan. 14th, 4:00 pm Roseville Historical Society meeting at Carnegie Museums, 557 Lincoln St., Roseville. (916) 773-3003


Jan. 15th, 6:30 pm Loomis Basin Historical Society meeting at the Loomis library. (916) 663-3971

Jan. 20th, 6:00 pm
Forest Hill Divide Historical Society business meeting, at the Forest Hill Divide Museum. (530) 367-3535


Jan. 20th, 7:00 pm Rocklin Historical Society Meeting at Old St. Mary’s Chapel, 5152 Front Street, Rocklin. (916) 624-3464


Jan. 23rd, 7:00 pm Placer County Genealogical Society general meeting, in the Beecher Room, at the Auburn Library. (530) 885-2216



February

Feb. 6th, 6:30 pm Placer County Historical Society Dinner Meeting at the Auburn Veterans Memorial Hall, 100 East St., Auburn. (530) 885-5074


Feb. 11th, 4:00 pm Roseville Historical Society Meeting at the Carnegie Museum. 557 Lincoln Street, Roseville. (916) 773-3003

Feb 17th, 7:00 pm Rocklin Historical Society Meeting at Old St. Mary’s Chapel, 5152 Front Street, Rocklin. (916) 624-3464

Feb. 19th, 6:30 pm Loomis Basin Historical Society Meeting at the Loomis Library. (916) 663-3871


Feb. 20th, 5:30 pm Historical Advisory Board Meeting at the Bernhard Museum Winery, 291 Auburn-Folsom Rd. Auburn. (530) 889-6500

Feb. 27th, 7:00 pm
7:00 pm Placer County Genealogical Society general meeting in the Beecher Room at the Auburn Library. Contact 530-885-2216.

 

Placer County Historical Organizations

Colfax Area Historical Society
Helen Wayland, (530) 346-7040 colfaxhistory.org

Donner Summit Historical Society
Bill Oudegeest, (209) 606-6859 donnersummithistoricalsociety.org

Foresthill Divide Historical Society
Sandy Simester, (530) 367-3535 foresthillhistory.org

Fruitvale School Hall Community Association
Lyndell Grey, (916) 645-3517

Golden Drift Historical Society
Jim Ricker, (530) 389-8344

Historical Advisory Board 
Glenn Vineyard, (916) 747-1961

Old Town Auburn Preservation Society 
Lynn Carpenter, (530) 885-1252

Joss House Museum and Chinese History Center 
 Richard Yue, (530) 346-7121

Lincoln Area Archives Museum
Shirley Russell, (916) 645-3800

Lincoln Highway Association
Bob Dieterich, bobd@iname.com lincolnhwy.org

Loomis Basin Historical Society
Karen Clifford, (916) 663-3871 ppgn.com/loomishistorical.html

Maidu Museum & Historic Site 
Glenie Strome, (916) 782-3299 roseville.ca.us/indianmuseum

Native Sons of the Golden West, Parlor #59 
Dave Allen, (530) 878-2878 dsallen59@sbcglobal.net

Newcastle Portuguese Hall Association 
Aileen Gage, (530) 885-911

Roseville Fire Museum
Shari Tasler (916) 538-1809

Placer County Historical Society 
Michael Otten, (530) 888-7837 placercountyhistoricalsociety.org

Placer County Museums Docent Guild 
Tom Innes, (530) 888-8969

Rocklin Historical Society 
Jean Sippola, (916) 652-1034 rocklinhistory.org

Roseville Historical Society 
Phoebe Astill, (916) 773-3003 rosevillehistorical.org

North Lake Tahoe Historical Society 
Javier Rodriguez, (530) 583-1762 northtahoemuseums.org

Placer County Genealogical Society 
Toni Rosasco (530) 888-8036 pcgenes.com